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Citations: Chicago/Turabian

Basic tips on the three main citation styles and links to more information.

Chicago

Chicago/ Turabian Style

Chicago Style is a standardized way of citing resources used in academic research. This style of formatting originated at the University of Chicago Press. Academic writing sometimes uses a slight variation of the Chicago Style called Turabian. Traditionally, Chicago Style is used for academic papers written in the subject areas of History, Art History, and Music. It is important to check with instructors to see which formatting style they prefer.

A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers is available at the Main Campus library.  The call number is LB 2369 .T8 2007.

More information about Chicago Style can be found at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html.

Chicago - Footnotes and Endnotes

Chicago Style is different than MLA and APA, and does not use in-text citations the same way. Chicago style uses superscript numbers (1) to indicate that a work is being cited.  Full citations for all resources are then placed in the paper as either footnotes or endnotes.  Footnotes are placed at the bottom of each page.  Endnotes come at the end of a paper, chapter, or book.
 
Paraphrasing a Source: You may summarize or paraphrase the original words, thought, or idea; however, credit must be given to the source.
  • Sweeney argues that the drawbridge in the Valley of the Ashes in The Great Gatsby was based on the Northern Boulevard Bridge that crossed Flushing Creek1.
When you incorporate a direct quotation into a sentence, you must cite the source. Fit quotations within your sentences: 
  • Robert Trogdon believes that Hemingway’s manuscripts were not transcribed correctly due to “difficulty reading Hemingway’s handwriting”2.
The citations for the Sweeney and Trogdon articles should be either a footnote at the bottom of the page or an endnote at the end of the paper.
 
Examples:
1. Sweeney, James G. “Searching for George Wilson’s Garage.” The Explicator 70, no. 4 (2012): 308-13. Accessed November 5, 2015. doi:10.1080/00144940.2012.727905.
 
2. Trogdon, Robert W. “The Sun Also Rises: The Hemingway Library Edition, Supplemented with Early Drafts and Deleted Chapters.” Hemingway Review 32, no. 2: 128-132. Accessed November 5, 2015. doi:10.1353/hem.2015.0003.

Chicago Style Guide

Chicago - Citing Print Resources

Print Book:
Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.
 
Examples:
Macintyre, Ben. Double Cross: The True Story of the D-day Spies. New York: Crown, 2012.
 
Journal Article:
 Last name, First name. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume number, no. issue number (year): page numbers.
 
Example:

Lee, Richard H., Carl F. Pieper, and Cathleen Colón-Emeric. "Functional Impairments Mediate Association Between Clinical Fracture Risk and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Older Women." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 63, no. 8 (2015): 1546-551.

Chicago - Citing Online Sources

Website:
Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Title of Website. Month Date, Year of Publication. Month Date, Year of Access. URL.
 
Example:
 "Bringing Child Health Services Closer to Rural Communities in Malawi." World Health Organization. November 1, 2015. Accessed November 4, 2015. 
 
Articles Retrieved from Online Databases:
Last name, First name. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume number, no. issue number, page numbers. doi: .
 
Example:
Sweeney, James G. “Searching for George Wilson’s Garage.” The Explicator 70, no. 4 (2012): 308-13. Accessed November 5, 2015. doi:10.1080/00144940.2012.727905.
 
E-book:
Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication. Accessed Date.  Means of Access. URL.
 
Example:
Soto, Michael. Modernist Nation : Generation, Renaissance, and Twentieth-Century American Literature. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press, 2004. Accessed November 5, 2015. ProQuest ebrary. http://site.ebrary.com/lib/vgcc/detail.action?docID=10387767.

More Chicago/Turabian Help

Subject Guide

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Credit

Thank you to Surry Community College Library for their assistance in creating this guide.

Need help?  Contact the VGCC Library.